Journal Article

The Victorian Ethical Foundations of Social Work in England—Continuity and Contradiction

Bill Forsythe and Bill Jordan

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 32, issue 7, pages 847-862
Published in print October 2002 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online October 2002 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/32.7.847
The Victorian Ethical Foundations of Social Work in England—Continuity and Contradiction

Show Summary Details

Preview

In this article we argue that during the Victorian era certain ethical foundations of best practice were identified and were central to the work of particular individuals. We also argue that there was a strongly discriminatory moralistic basis to social policy and mainstream charitable intervention that militated against these ethical foundations. We suggest that this contradiction is replicated in New Labour's ‘Third Way’ and that we need to heed the tradition of social inclusion espoused by some of the Victorian practitioners discussed if we genuinely mean to put into practice the ideas of social worth and community espoused by New Labour rather than return to the Victorian distinction between the ‘respectable’ or ‘deserving’ poor and the ‘pauper’.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.