Journal Article

Contingent on Context? Social Work and the State in Australia, Britain, and the USA

Catherine McDonald, John Harris and Richard Wintersteen

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 33, issue 2, pages 191-208
Published in print March 2003 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online March 2003 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/33.2.191
Contingent on Context? Social Work and the State in Australia, Britain, and the USA

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The notion that social work is an international profession, operating with generally similar goals, methodologies, and common values is considered critically. Examining the political and social contexts of three countries with liberal democratic governments—Australia, Britain and the United States—the role of social work within the welfare processes of each country is compared. While social work as an identifiable professional activity shares some features, it is argued that the idea of its having a core essence needs to be tempered with a realistic assessment of the importance of contextually created difference. Recent and rapid developments in the institutional context, such as those experienced in these three countries, further underscore the limited utility of the notion of a common professional project.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

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