Journal Article

Are Young People in Correctional Institutions Different from Community Students Who Have Never Been Convicted?: Differences in Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviours

Byoungduk Sohn

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 33, issue 6, pages 739-752
Published in print September 2003 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online September 2003 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/33.6.739
Are Young People in Correctional Institutions Different from Community Students Who Have Never Been Convicted?: Differences in Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviours

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By comparing the prevalence of emotional and behaviour health problems among institutionalized juvenile offenders with that amongst a non‐offending sample of adolescents, this study indicates common characteristics of the perceived emotional and behavioural problems, and describes risk factors pertinent to persistent juvenile offending. Familial backgrounds, behavioural and emotional measures were collected through self‐report surveys. Results showed that young people in secure units claimed significant high levels of emotional and behavioural problems and that those problems were associated with their disadvantaged familial socio‐economic backgrounds and perceived parenting factors. Various policy implications are recommended to tackle problems amongst these disadvantaged young people in correctional institutions in Korea. In particular, for those working with young people in correctional institutions in the UK, the findings highlight the importance of culturally relevant programmes.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

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