Journal Article

A Camel’s Nose Under the Tent? Some Australian Perspectives on Confidentiality and Social Work Practice

Phillip A. Swain

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 36, issue 1, pages 91-107
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online October 2005 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bch248
A Camel’s Nose Under the Tent? Some Australian Perspectives on Confidentiality and Social Work Practice

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article examines contemporary meanings attributed to the ethical principle of confidentiality—a core practice dimension for social workers—in the context of current practice realities and legislative requirements. The meanings usually attributed to the term, together with Code of Practice requirements, are considered alongside the organizational and legal riders so frequently used to justify a stepping away from what clients may consider confidentiality to require. The particular difficulties associated for those in practice with families and children, and the implications of attention to best interests and paramount rights notions, are examined. The article concludes that, in lieu of a misleading commitment to confidentiality, the practitioner rather needs to commit to respectful and open dealing with client information.

Keywords: confidentiality; ethics; best interests; social work practice.

Journal Article.  7285 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.