Journal Article

International Perspectives on the Use of Community Treatment Orders: Implications for Mental Health Social Workers

Jim Campbell, Lisa Brophy, Bill Healy and Ann Marie O’Brien

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 36, issue 7, pages 1101-1118
Published in print October 2006 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online February 2006 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bch423
International Perspectives on the Use of Community Treatment Orders: Implications for Mental Health Social Workers

Show Summary Details

Preview

Substantial changes to mental health law and policy have occurred throughout the Western world during the last decade. The drift towards control, particularly in the form of Community Treatment Orders (CTOs), has profound implications for the role of mental health social workers, yet this issue is rarely discussed in academic literature. This paper seeks to redress this gap in knowledge by examining aspects of law, policy and practice using three case studies: Victoria, Australia; Ontario, Canada; and regions of the UK. The paper begins by critically reviewing selected literature on CTOs, revealing competing claims about efficacy and their impact upon service users1 and practitioners. A discussion of policy and practice contexts in the three jurisdictions is then presented and supported with a typology, to illustrate contrasts and comparisons. In their conclusions, the authors assert that mental health social workers often have a crucial part to play in the implementation of CTOs but that this is not always acknowledged in law and organizational policy. Social workers’ roles and responsibilities need to be more explicitly identified in mental health law. At the same time, there should be a continuing debate about how such coercive powers fit with codes of ethics and practice standards, at national and international levels.

Keywords: Community Treatment Orders (CTOs); mental health social workers

Journal Article.  7750 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.