Journal Article

A Comparative Survey of Aotearoa New Zealand and UK Social Workers on the Role of Religion and Spirituality in Practice

Blair Stirling, Leola Dyrud Furman, Perry W. Benson, Edward R. Canda and Cordelia Grimwood

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 40, issue 2, pages 602-621
Published in print March 2010 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online February 2009 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcp008
A Comparative Survey of Aotearoa New Zealand and UK Social Workers on the Role of Religion and Spirituality in Practice

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Summary

Increasingly, social work is being challenged to consider the role of spirituality and religion in practice and education as the profession has witnessed an expanding interest in the integration of spirituality, motivated by the recognition of spiritual diversity as an important component of human experience, cultural competency and anti-racist social work practice. In response to the lack of international empirical research in general, and relating to spirituality in particular, cross-national survey research was conducted in Aotearoa New Zealand (ANZ) and the UK as part of a larger multi-national study of social workers' attitudes about the role of spirituality in their practice. Although the two countries share some cultural similarities due to the impact of secularization, British settlement and colonization in ANZ, there are also significant differences related to the unique multicultural make-up of ANZ, emphasizing the indigenous Maori and the centrality of spirituality within a Maori worldview.

Keywords: Spirituality; religion; social work education; social work practice

Journal Article.  7468 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

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