Journal Article

The Social Work Profession and Subjective Well-Being: The Impact of a Profession on Overall Subjective Well-Being

John R. Graham and Micheal L. Shier

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 40, issue 5, pages 1553-1572
Published in print July 2010 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online May 2009 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcp049
The Social Work Profession and Subjective Well-Being: The Impact of a Profession on Overall Subjective Well-Being

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This research analyses social work practitioners' workplace experiences of their subjective well-being (SWB), the social scientific concept of happiness. From an initial survey of 700 Canadian social workers, thirteen respondents with the highest SWB scores were interviewed. Respondents reported that their high SWB scores were partially a result of available practice opportunities associated with the profession, their ability to recognise professional boundaries and limitations, the role of specific practices that are associated with the profession of social work, social work principles and respondents' perception of their professional self. The conclusion considers implications for workplace practices, social work education and further research.

Keywords: Subjective well-being; social workers; workplace; professional affiliation; education

Journal Article.  7435 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

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