Journal Article

Comparing Possible ‘Child-Abuse-Related-Deaths’ in England and Wales with the Major Developed Countries 1974–2006: Signs of Progress?

Colin Pritchard and Richard Williams

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 40, issue 6, pages 1700-1718
Published in print September 2010 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online August 2009 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcp089
Comparing Possible ‘Child-Abuse-Related-Deaths’ in England and Wales with the Major Developed Countries 1974–2006: Signs of Progress?

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This paper explores ‘child abuse-related deaths’ (CARD) and possible CARD rates of children aged from birth to fourteen years over the period 1974–2006. It uses the latest available WHO mortality data to compare England and Wales outcomes with the other major developed countries (MDC), to see how much progress has been made in reducing actual and possible CARD in England and Wales and the other MDC. The results tell a relative ‘success story’ for England and Wales, whose violent CARD rates of children have never been lower since records began and who have made significantly greater progress in reducing violent possible CARD than the majority of the other MDC. Moreover, England and Wales were only one of four MDC whose CARD deaths, primarily the responsibility of the children protection services (CPS), fell significantly more that ‘All Causes of Death’, the primary responsibility of medicine. Though there is an overlap of services, the greater improvement in the CPS-related deaths than those primarily related to child health reflect well on the CPS. This should help to offset something of the media stereotypes and be a boost for the morale of front line staff of the CPS and the families whom they serve.

Keywords: International; comparison; child abuse; deaths

Journal Article.  6726 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

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