Journal Article

From fish to man: understanding endogenous remyelination in central nervous system demyelinating diseases

Monique Dubois-Dalcq, Anna Williams, Christine Stadelmann, Bruno Stankoff, Bernard Zalc and Catherine Lubetzki

in Brain

Published on behalf of The Guarantors of Brain

Volume 131, issue 7, pages 1686-1700
Published in print July 2008 | ISSN: 0006-8950
Published online May 2008 | e-ISSN: 1460-2156 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awn076
From fish to man: understanding endogenous remyelination in central nervous system demyelinating diseases

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In the central nervous system (CNS) of man, evolutionary pressure has preserved some capability for remyelination while axonal regeneration is very limited. In contrast, two efficient programmes of regeneration exist in the adult fish CNS, neurite regrowth and remyelination. The rapidity of CNS remyelination is critical since it not only restores fast conduction of nerve impulses but also maintains axon integrity. If myelin repair fails, axons degenerate, leading to increased disability. In the human CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), remyelination often takes place in the midst of inflammation. Here, we discuss recent studies that address the innate repair capabilities of the axon-glia unit from fish to man. We propose that expansion of this research field will help find ways to maintain or enhance spontaneous remyelination in man.

Keywords: multiple sclerosis; nodes of Ranvier; enhancing repair; animal models; transparent fish

Journal Article.  10671 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neurology ; Neuroscience

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