Journal Article

Greater loss of axons in primary progressive multiple sclerosis plaques compared to secondary progressive disease

E. C. Tallantyre, L. Bø, O. Al-Rawashdeh, T. Owens, C. H. Polman, J. Lowe and N. Evangelou

in Brain

Published on behalf of The Guarantors of Brain

Volume 132, issue 5, pages 1190-1199
Published in print May 2009 | ISSN: 0006-8950
Published online May 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2156 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awp106
Greater loss of axons in primary progressive multiple sclerosis plaques compared to secondary progressive disease

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The pathological substrate of progressive disability in multiple sclerosis is hypothesized to be axonal loss. Differences in the demographic, pathological and radiological features of patients with primary progressive compared with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis raise the question as to whether they actually represent separate clinical entities. So far, large pathological studies comparing axonal damage between primary progressive and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis have not been reported. In this clinico-pathological study we examined the cervical spinal cord in patients with primary and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Human cervical spinal cord was derived at autopsy from 54 patients (17 primary progressive, 30 secondary progressive and 7 controls). Tissue was stained immunohistochemically and examined to determine: (i) the number of surviving corticospinal tract axons; (ii) the extent of grey and white matter demyelination; (iii) the degree of inflammation inside and outside of lesions; and (iv) the relationship between demyelination and axonal loss. Associated clinical data was used to calculate expanded disability status scale for each patient preceding death. Motor disability in the primary progressive and secondary progressive groups was similar preceding death. Secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients showed considerably more extensive demyelination of both the white and grey matter of the cervical spinal cord. The total number of corticospinal axons was equally low in primary progressive and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis groups versus controls. The reduction of axonal density in demyelinated regions compared to normal appearing white matter was significantly more extensive in primary progressive versus secondary progressive patients (33% reduction versus 16% reduction, P < 0.001). These findings suggest axonal loss is the pathological substrate of progressive disability in both primary progressive and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis with a common plaque-centred mechanism. More extensive axonal loss within areas of demyelination in primary progressive multiple sclerosis could explain high levels of axonal loss observed in these patients despite low levels of demyelination.

Keywords: multiple sclerosis; axonal loss; primary progressive; secondary progressive

Journal Article.  5658 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neurology ; Neuroscience

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