Journal Article

Faulkner, Jews, and the New Deal: The Regional Commitments of ‘Barn Burning’

Thomas Peyser

in The Cambridge Quarterly

Published on behalf of Cambridge Quarterly

Volume 42, issue 1, pages 1-19
Published in print March 2013 | ISSN: 0008-199X
Published online March 2013 | e-ISSN: 1471-6836 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/camqtly/bft011
Faulkner, Jews, and the New Deal: The Regional Commitments of ‘Barn Burning’

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In ‘Barn Burning’, Faulkner portrays a South beleaguered by two threats emblematic of modernity: diasporic pooulations and powerful central government. Abner Snopes, who displays many stereotypically Jewish characteristics, embodies an ethnic threat to Southern culture. On the other hand, the iconic embodiment of Southern values in the story, the de Spain mansion, can be seen as a counterthrust against attempts by New Dealers to deploy architectural monumentality in their effort to forge an explicitly national identity. ‘Barn Burning’ repulses racial and cultural incursions in the name of anti-modern regionalism.

Journal Article.  8328 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literature ; Art ; Film ; Music

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