Journal Article

Positive association between dietary fat intake and risk of gastric stump carcinoma in rats

Koichi Miwa, Shinichi Kinami, Itsuo Miyazaki and Takanori Hattori

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 17, issue 9, pages 1885-1889
Published in print September 1996 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online September 1996 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/17.9.1885
Positive association between dietary fat intake and risk of gastric
                    stump carcinoma in rats

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Effect of high- and low-fat diets on gastric stump carcino-genesis was experimentally investigated. A total of 130 Wistar male rats weighing 250–300 g received either sham operation or Billroth II partial gastrectomy, the resection of the distal two-thirds glandular stomach and reconstruction of gastro-jejunostomy. After surgery, each group of rats was switched from a standard diet (CRF-1) to a special diet containing either 15% soybean oil (high-fat) or 0.5% soybean (low-fat), fed ad libitum and tap water, and were killed 50 weeks after surgery. Gastric tumours were observed only in the animals that underwent gastrectomy, while no tumours were detected in the animals following the sham operation. Tumours located invariably at the gastrojejunostoma, were carcinomas or adenomas in histology. Carcinomas developed in 12 of 29 gastrectomy animals (41%) fed the high-fat diet and 4 of 27 gastrectomy animals (15%) fed the low-fat diet. The difference was significant (P < 0.05). The incidence of adenoma was also significantly higher in the gastrectomy animals fed the high-fat diet (38%) than that in those fed the low-fat diet (15%) (P < 0.05). A daily faecal output of bile acids was significantly greater in the gastrectomy animals fed the high-fat diet (19.0 ± 16.4 μmol/day) than that in those fed the low-fat diet (11.2 ± 6.2 μmol/day; P < 0.05). This study suggests that increased fat intake is associated with a high risk of gastric stump carcinoma.

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Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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