Journal Article

Elevated mitochondrial cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in rat tissues after transplacental cisplatin exposure.

A J Giurgiovich, B A Diwan, O A Olivero, L M Anderson, J M Rice and M C Poirier

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 18, issue 1, pages 93-96
Published in print January 1997 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online January 1997 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/18.1.93
Elevated mitochondrial cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in rat tissues after transplacental cisplatin exposure.

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Although there is evidence that the toxic effects of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) include morphologically abnormal mitochondria, direct demonstrations of mitochondrial DNA damage by this chemotherapeutic agent have rarely been reported. Here we show that, in rats exposed to a single dose of cisplatin during gestation, cisplatin-DNA binding levels in both maternal and fetal liver and brain mitochondrial DNA are higher than those observed in genomic DNA. Pregnant F344/NCr rats were injected i.p. with either 5 or 15 mg cisplatin/kg body wt at 18 days of gestation and killed 24 h later. Cisplatin-DNA adducts were determined by dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluoroimmunoassay using a cisplatin-DNA standard modified in the same range as the biological samples. Values for genomic cisplatin-DNA adducts in multiple maternal and fetal tissues have been presented elsewhere. Here, genomic DNA adduct levels for liver, brain, kidney and placenta are reported again for comparison with mitochondrial DNA adduct levels in the same tissues. In maternal and fetal brain, mitochondrial DNA adduct levels were approximately 7- to 50-fold higher than genomic DNA adduct levels, and in fetal liver they were approximately 2- to 16-fold higher than genomic DNA adduct levels. These studies demonstrate extensive cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in brain and liver mitochondria of fetal rats exposed transplacentally and suggest that mitochondrial DNA in some organs may be a particular target for cisplatin genotoxicity.

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Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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