Journal Article

Protection against induction of mouse skin papillomas with low and high risk of conversion to malignancy by green tea polyphenols.

S K Katiyar, R R Mohan, R Agarwal and H Mukhtar

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 18, issue 3, pages 497-502
Published in print March 1997 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online March 1997 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/18.3.497
Protection against induction of mouse skin papillomas with low and high risk of conversion to malignancy by green tea polyphenols.

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We earlier showed that a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) affords protection against tumor promotion and tumor progression in SENCAR mouse skin. The present study was designed to further evaluate the protective effect of GTP against the induction and subsequent progression of papillomas to squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in experimental protocols where papillomas were developed with a low or high probability of their malignant conversion. Topical application of GTP (6 mg/animal) 30 min prior to that of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either once a week for 5 weeks (high risk TPA protocol) or once a week for 20 weeks (low risk TPA protocol) or mezerein (MEZ) twice a week for 20 weeks (high risk MEZ protocol) in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated mouse skin resulted in significant protection against skin tumor promotion in terms of tumor incidence (32-60%), multiplicity (49-63%) and tumor volume/mouse (73-90%) at the termination of the experiment at 20 weeks. In three separate malignant progression experiments when papilloma yield in DMBA-initiated and TPA or MEZ promoted low and high risk protocols was stabilized at 20 weeks, animals were divided into two subgroups. These animals were either topically treated twice weekly with acetone (0.2 ml/animal, spontaneous malignant conversion group) or with GTP (6 mg/animal in 0.2 ml acetone) for an additional period of 31 weeks. During these treatment regimens, all suspected carcinomas were recorded and each one was verified histopathologically either at the time when tumor-bearing mouse died/moribund or at the termination of the experiment at 51 weeks. GTP resulted in significant protection against the malignant conversion of papillomas to SCC in all the protocols employed. At the termination of the experiment at 51 weeks, these protective effects were evident in terms of mice with carcinomas (35-41%), carcinomas per mouse (47-55%) and percent malignant conversion of papillomas to carcinomas (47-58%). The kinetics of malignant conversion suggest that a subset of papillomas formed in the early phase of tumor promotion in all the protocols had a higher probability of malignant conversion into SCCs because all the positive control groups (acetone treated) produced nearly the same number of carcinomas (33-38 in a group of 20 animals) at the end of the progression period. In the GTP-treated group of animals the number of carcinomas formed was less (14-20 in a group of 20 animals), which shows the ability of GTP to protect against the malignant conversion of papillomas of higher probability of malignant conversion to SCCs. The results of this study suggest that irrespective of the risk involved, GTP may be highly useful in affording protection against skin cancer risk.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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