Journal Article

Site- and strand-specific mismatch repair of human H-ras genomic DNA in a mammalian cell line.

L Arcangeli, J Simonetti, C Pongratz and K J Williams

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 18, issue 7, pages 1311-1318
Published in print July 1997 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online July 1997 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/18.7.1311
Site- and strand-specific mismatch repair of human H-ras genomic DNA in a mammalian cell line.

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Defective mismatch repair has recently been implicated as the major contributor towards the mutator phenotype observed in tumour cell lines derived from patients diagnosed with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC). Cell lines from other cancer-prone syndromes, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, have been found to be defective in nucleotide excision repair of damaged bases. Some genetic complementation groups are defective specifically in transcription-coupled excision repair, although this type of repair defect has not been associated with cancer proneness. Mechanisms contributing to the high incidence of activating point mutations in oncogenes (such as H-ras codon 12) are not understood. It is possible that novel mechanisms of misrepair or misreplication occur at these sites in addition to the above DNA repair mechanisms. In this study, we have compared the rate of strand-directed mismatch repair of four mispairs (G:A, A:C, T:C and G:T) at the H-ras codon 12, middle G:C position. Our results indicate that, although this location is not a 'hot spot' for bacterial mismatch repair, it is a 'hot spot' for decreased repair of specific mismatched bases within NIH 3T3 cells. NIH 3T3, unlike Escherichia coli, have an extremely low repair rate of the G:A mispair (35%), as well as the A:C mispair (58%) at this location. NIH 3T3 also have a moderately low repair rate of the T:C mispair (80%) at the codon 12 location. Conversely, NIH 3T3 repair of G:T (100%) is comparable to E. coli repair (94%) of this mismatch. These results demonstrate that a mismatch containing an incorrect adenine on either strand at the H-ras codon 12 middle base pair location is most likely to undergo a mutational event in NIH 3T3 cells. Conversely, a mismatch containing an incorrect thymine in the transcribed strand is least likely to undergo a mutational event.

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Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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