Journal Article

Population-based study of glutathione S-transferase mu gene deletion in adult glioma cases and controls.

J K Wiencke, M R Wrensch, R Miike, Z Zuo and K T Kelsey

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 18, issue 7, pages 1431-1433
Published in print July 1997 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online July 1997 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/18.7.1431
Population-based study of glutathione S-transferase mu gene deletion in adult glioma cases and controls.

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Gene deletion at the glutathione S-transferase mu locus (GSTM1) has previously been associated with increased risk for environmentally-induced cancers (e.g. smoking-related lung cancer). In the present study we examined the hypothesis that GSTM1 deletion is a risk factor for malignant brain tumors in adults. We compared the prevalence of the GSTM1 homozygous deletion polymorphism in 158 Caucasian adults with gliomas with 157 controls. Cases and controls were drawn from a large population-based case-control study of brain cancers in six San Francisco Bay area counties. Overall, the prevalence of the GSTM1 deletion was similar in cases (83/158; 53%) and controls (78/157; 50%). Among brain tumor cases, analysis of variance modeling indicated a significant interaction of GSTM1 genotype and gender associated with age at diagnosis (P = 0.02). This effect was due to the fact that women with GSTM1 deletion were younger on average at diagnosis than women who were GSTM1 positive (43.9 years versus 52.4 years, respectively). Age at diagnosis among men was similar for those who were GSTM1 deleted and GSTM1 positive (49.4 years and 47.2 years, respectively). The younger age at diagnosis of GSTM1 null female cases compared with GSTM1 positive cases was observed in astrocytoma as well as the higher grade tumors (e.g. glioblastoma multiforme). There was no association of GSTM1 deletion with age or gender in controls. These studies suggest that among female cases, GSTM1 deletion may be associated with earlier age at onset. Confirmation of these findings could provide important clues to gene-environment interactions in the etiology of malignant brain tumors.

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Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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