Journal Article

Truncal site and detoxifying enzyme polymorphisms significantly reduce time to presentation of further primary cutaneous basal cell carcinoma.

J T Lear, A G Smith, A H Heagerty, B Bowers, P W Jones, J Gilford, J Alldersea, R C Strange and A A Fryer

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 18, issue 8, pages 1499-1503
Published in print August 1997 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online August 1997 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/18.8.1499
Truncal site and detoxifying enzyme polymorphisms significantly reduce time to presentation of further primary cutaneous basal cell carcinoma.

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Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the commonest cancer in Caucasians. Its incidence is rising and many patients develop multiple primary tumours at separate sites. Factors determining time between first primary tumour presentation and the next new primary lesion are unclear. We used Cox's proportional hazards model to study, in 856 Caucasians, the influence of tumour site, individual characteristics and polymorphism in glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1, GSTT1) and cytochrome P450 (CYP2D6, CYP1A1) loci on time to next primary tumour presentation. More than one tumour at first presentation (P <0.0001, hazard ratio 2.72) and GSTT1 null (P = 0.028, hazard ratio 1.74) were associated with decreased time to next primary tumour presentation. Significant two-factor interactions, corrected for number of tumours at presentation, were identified between a truncal tumour at first presentation and each of male gender, GSTM1 null and CYP2D6 EM (P <0.003, hazard ratios 3.09-3.82). In each of these cases, all patients with the risk combination demonstrated further separate tumours within 5 years of first presentation. Thus, patients with a truncal tumour at first presentation, especially males and those presenting with more than one lesion have a significantly decreased time to presentation of further tumours and should receive more meticulous follow-up. Polymorphism in GSTM1 and CYP2D6 also influences the rate of new primary tumour accrual giving insights into the link between ultraviolet exposure and multiple tumour development.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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