Journal Article

Frequent reduction of gap junctional intercellular communication and connexin43 expression in human and mouse lung carcinoma cells.

K Cesen-Cummings, M J Fernstrom, A M Malkinson and R J Ruch

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 19, issue 1, pages 61-67
Published in print January 1998 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online January 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/19.1.61
Frequent reduction of gap junctional intercellular communication and connexin43 expression in human and mouse lung carcinoma cells.

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The reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and gap junction protein (connexin) expression that have been noted in many neoplastic cell types may contribute to the neoplastic phenotype. We assessed GJIC (by fluorescent dye micro-injection) and connexin expression (by Northern blotting, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry) in five mouse and 17 human lung carcinoma cell lines; both measures were lower in neoplastic cells compared to non-transformed lung epithelial cells. Other connexins were not detected in these cells. Co-culture experiments indicated that carcinoma cell lines able to transfer dye among themselves (homologous GJIC) had little capacity for dye-coupling with non-transformed cells (heterologous GJIC). Southern blot analyses indicated that reductions in GJIC and connexin43 expression were not due to deletions or rearrangements of this gene, but were more likely accounted for by transcriptional down-regulation and/or post-transcriptional factors. No correlations between GJIC and known oncogene and tumor suppressor gene alterations in the human lung carcinoma cells were apparent, suggesting that other mechanisms down-regulate GJIC in these cells. Since the neoplastic cell lines exhibited low GJIC (either homologous or heterologous), this characteristic may be involved in expression of the neoplastic phenotype.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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