Journal Article

A pilot study testing the association between N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 and risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma in Japanese people.

T Katoh, S Kaneko, R Boissy, M Watson, K Ikemura and D A Bell

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 19, issue 10, pages 1803-1807
Published in print October 1998 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online October 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/19.10.1803
A pilot study testing the association between N-acetyltransferases 1 and 2 and risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma in Japanese people.

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Risk of oral cancer has been associated with exposure to tobacco smoke, alcohol and with genetic predisposition. The aromatic amines and their metabolites, a class of carcinogens present in tobacco smoke, undergo metabolism (activation or detoxification) through an N- or O-acetylation pathway by the polymorphic enzymes, N-acetyltransferases (NAT)1 or NAT2. The genes that encode these enzymes, NAT1 and NAT2, have a variety of high and low activity alleles and we analyzed these genetic polymorphisms in 62 oral squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 122 healthy control subjects from Japan. NAT1 alleles tested were NAT1*3 (C1095A), NAT1*4 (functional reference allele), NAT1*10 (T1088A,C1095A), NAT1*11(9 bp deletion), NAT1*14 (G560A), NAT1*15 (C559T) and NAT1*17 (C190T). No low activity alleles (NAT1*14, NAT1*15 and NAT1*17) were observed in these Japanese subjects. We observed significantly increased risk [odds ratio 3.72; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56-8.90; P < 0.01] associated with the NAT1*10 allele, an allele that contains a variant polyadenylation signal. Stratifying by smoking status we found odds ratios of 5.9 (95% CI 1.13-30.6; P < 0.05) for non-smokers with the NAT1*10 allele and 3.1 (95% CI 1.09-9.07; P < 0.05) for smokers, but these risks were not significantly different from each other. Thus, we did not observe that NAT1*10 alleles confer differential risk among smokers and non-smokers. NAT2 rapid acetylation genotype was not a significant risk factor for oral cancer in this Japanese study population. This is the first study to test for oral cancer risk associated with polymorphism in the NAT1 and NAT2 genes, and these positive findings in our pilot study, while based on small numbers, suggest that the NAT1*10 allele may be a genetic determinant of oral squamous cell carcinoma among Japanese people.

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Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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