Journal Article

Smoking-associated bulky DNA adducts in bronchial tissue related to CYP1A1 MspI and GSTM1 genotypes in lung patients.

B Schoket, D H Phillips, S Kostic and I Vincze

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 19, issue 5, pages 841-846
Published in print May 1998 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online May 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/19.5.841
Smoking-associated bulky DNA adducts in bronchial tissue related to CYP1A1 MspI and GSTM1 genotypes in lung patients.

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Relationships between smoking status and levels of bulky DNA adducts were investigated in bronchial tissue of lung patients in relation to their GSTM1 and CYP1A1 MspI genotypes. A total of 150 Hungarian patients undergoing pulmonary surgery were included in the study, 124 with lung malignancies and 26 with non-malignant lung conditions. There were significant relationships between smoking status and bulky DNA adduct levels, as determined by 32P-post-labelling analysis, in macroscopically normal bronchial tissues. There was a highly significant difference in the adduct levels of a combined group consisting of current smokers and short-term ex-smokers (< or = 1 year abstinence) compared with life-time non-smokers and long-term ex-smokers (> 1 year abstinence) (P = 0.0001). The apparent half-life was estimated to be 1.7 years for bulky DNA adducts in the bronchial tissue from ex-smokers. There were no statistically significant correlations between (i) daily cigarette dose and DNA adduct levels in current smokers, (ii) DNA adduct level and histological type of lung cancer, or (iii) GSTM1 and CYP1A1 MspI genotypes and DNA adduct levels after adjustment for either smoking status or malignancy. By multiple logistic regression analysis, smoking and GSTM1 null genotype were found to be risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma. However, bulky DNA adduct levels in bronchial tissue did not appear to be a statistically-significant risk factor for the major histological types of lung cancer.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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