Journal Article

Black tea and mammary gland carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in rats fed control or high fat diets.

A E Rogers, L J Hafer, Y S Iskander and S Yang

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 19, issue 7, pages 1269-1273
Published in print July 1998 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online July 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/19.7.1269
Black tea and mammary gland carcinogenesis by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in rats fed control or high fat diets.

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Epidemiological studies suggest that tea may reduce cancer risk, and in laboratory rodents, chemopreventive effects of tea or purified extracts of tea have been demonstrated in lung, gastrointestinal tract and skin. There is some evidence of chemoprevention by tea in the mammary gland, but the data are not conclusive. In order to evaluate more fully the possible influence of black tea on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary gland tumors in the female S-D (Sprague-Dawley) rat, three large studies were performed: experiment 1, tumorigenesis in rats fed AIN-76A diet and given 25 mg/kg DMBA and 1.25 or 2.5% whole tea extract or water to drink; experiment 2, tumorigenesis in rats given 15 mg/kg DMBA and the same diet and fluids as in experiment 1; experiment 3, tumorigenesis in rats fed control or HF (high fat, corn oil) diet and given 15 mg/kg DMBA and 2% tea or water to drink. Tea was given throughout the experiment; DMBA was given by gastric gavage at 8 weeks of age. There was no consistent effect of tea on tumorigenesis in rats fed AIN-76A diet; there was, however, evidence in experiment 3 of a reduction of tumorigenesis by tea in rats fed the HF diet. In experiment 3, rats fed the HF diet and given water showed the expected increase in tumor burden (number and weight) compared with rats fed control diet. However, rats fed the HF diet and given 2% tea showed no increase in tumor burden; their tumor burden was significantly lower than in rats fed the HF diet and given water (P < 0.01) and was not different from rats fed control diet and given water or tea. In addition, in experiment 3, the number of malignant tumors per tumor-bearing rat was increased by the HF diet in water-drinking rats (P < 0.01) but not in tea-drinking rats. Therefore, it appears that tea partially blocked the promotion of DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis by the HF diet.

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Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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