Journal Article

Increased ROS levels contribute to elevated transcription factor and MAP kinase activities in malignantly progressed mouse keratinocyte cell lines

Ashok Gupta, Sabine F. Rosenberger and G. Tim Bowden

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 20, issue 11, pages 2063-2073
Published in print November 1999 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online November 1999 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/20.11.2063
Increased ROS levels contribute to elevated transcription factor and MAP kinase activities in malignantly progressed mouse keratinocyte cell lines

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There is evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of tumor promotion and progression. The molecular mechanisms involved in ROS-mediated signaling, however, are unclear at present. Using ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as model physical and chemical carcinogens, we have malignantly progressed 308 cells, a papilloma-producing mouse keratinocyte cell line, and investigated the molecular alterations in the progressed phenotypes. In this study, we demonstrate that both MNNG and radiation-progressed malignant variants showed elevated ROS levels that contributed to their proliferative capacity in vitro as well as in vivo. We found increased Erk-1/2 and p38 MAP kinase activities to be important components of ROS-mediated signaling. The pro-oxidant state also contributed to constitutive elevation of AP-1, NFκB and cAMP response element transactivation in the malignant phenotype. Our data provide evidence for a functional role of elevated ROS levels in tumor progression and implicate Erk-1/2 and p38 MAP kinase activation in the malignant progression of mouse keratinocytes.

Keywords: CRE, cAMP response element; Erks, extracellular signal related kinases; JNKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinases; MAPKs, mitogen-activated protein; MNNG, N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine; PDTC, pyrollidine dithiocarbamate; ROS, reactive oxygen species.

Journal Article.  9013 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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