Journal Article

A comparison of the effects of dietary cellulose and fermentable galacto-oligosaccharide, in a rat model of colorectal carcinogenesis: fermentable fibre confers greater protection than non-fermentable fibre in both high and low fat backgrounds

M.V.W. Wijnands, M.J. Appel, V.M.H. Hollanders and R.A. Woutersen

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 20, issue 4, pages 651-656
Published in print April 1999 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online April 1999 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/20.4.651
A comparison of the effects of dietary cellulose and fermentable galacto-oligosaccharide, in a rat model of colorectal carcinogenesis: fermentable fibre confers greater protection than non-fermentable fibre in both high and low fat backgrounds

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The objective of this experiment was to compare the effects of diets with either a non-fermentable fibre source (cellulose) or a fermentable fibre source [galacto-oligosaccharide (GOS)], combined with different levels of dietary fat, on the development of colorectal cancer. Male Wistar rats were fed AIN76-based diets with either a low or high level of cellulose, or a low or high level of GOS, for 9 months. The fat content of the diets was low, medium or high. All rats were treated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine to induce colorectal tumours. Generally, the tumour incidence increased with increasing fat content in the diet. Despite marked faeces bulking, dietary cellulose either had no effect or an enhancing effect on the formation of colorectal tumours in general, although the development of carcinomas was decreased. GOS appeared to be highly protective against the development of colorectal tumours, as was demonstrated by an inhibitory effect on tumour incidence, multiplicity and size, regardless of the fat content of the diet. Neither fibre source influenced the bromodeoxyuridine labelling index determined in colon crypts or tumours. In animals fed high-GOS diets, the caecal content was significantly increased in weight and significantly decreased in pH. It was concluded that tumorigenesis was enhanced by increased fat content of the diet, and that the diets containing fermentable GOS conferred a greater protection against colorectal cancer than did the diets containing non-fermentable cellulose.

Keywords: BrdU, bromodeoxyuridine; FOS, fructo-oligosaccharides; GOS, galacto-oligosaccharides; HC, high cellulose; LC, low cellulose; NDO, non-digestible carbohydrates; PBS, phosphate-buffered saline; SCFA, short chain fatty acid.

Journal Article.  5233 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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