Journal Article

Comparison of the polymorphic regions of the cytochrome P450 <i>CYP2E1</i> gene of humans and patas and cynomolgus monkeys

Saranjit K. Chhabra, Carl D. Reed, Lucy M. Anderson and Yih-Horng Shiao

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 20, issue 6, pages 1031-1034
Published in print June 1999 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online June 1999 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/20.6.1031
Comparison of the polymorphic regions of the cytochrome P450 CYP2E1 gene of humans and patas and cynomolgus monkeys

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) metabolizes low molecular weight toxicants. CYP2E1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to risk of various cancers and liver disease in humans. Since the patas monkey is a promising model for study of cancer-related alcohol/nitrosamine interactions, we examined CYP2E1 in this monkey for characteristics of two regions that are polymorphic in humans, an RsaI site in the 5′ promoter region and a DraI site in intron 6. Another monkey species often used in biomedical research, the cynomolgus monkey, was also examined. Human DNA primers used to amplify a 413 bp segment around the RsaI site also amplified a segment of similar size (409 bp) from DNA of 25 patas monkeys, whereas a product of ~800 bp was amplified from DNA of eight cynomolgus monkeys. RsaI did not cut the amplified DNA product from either monkey species. Sequencing revealed that the patas RsaI site was identical to that in humans with the c2c2 CYP2E1 genotype, GTAT. The equivalent cynomolgus sequence, CTAC, has not been observed in humans. Thus, the patas monkey appears to be a useful model for CYP2E1 c2c2 humans, and this genotype, present in 2–25% of humans, may be more primitive than c1c1. For the DraI site, the human primers amplified DNA products similar in size to those from humans, from all patas and cynomolgus monkey DNA samples; none were cut by DraI. Thus, both monkey species appeared to be generally similar to humans of CYP2E1 CC DraI genotype, which is the rarer form of the gene.

Journal Article.  2867 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.