Journal Article

NAT2 slow acetylator genotype is associated with increased risk of lung cancer among non-smoking Chinese women in Singapore

Adeline Seow, Bin Zhao, Wee-Teng Poh, Ming Teh, Philip Eng, Yee-Tang Wang, Wan-Cheng Tan, Edmund J.D. Lee and Hin-Peng Lee

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 20, issue 9, pages 1877-1881
Published in print September 1999 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online September 1999 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/20.9.1877
NAT2 slow acetylator genotype is associated with increased risk of lung cancer among non-smoking Chinese women in Singapore

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Among non-smokers, the factors resulting in lung carcinogenesis are poorly understood. We conducted a hospital-based case-control analysis of 294 Chinese women, of whom 217 were non-smokers, to evaluate the role of polymorphic N-acetyltransferase (NAT2) as a susceptibility factor for the disease. The proportion of slow acetylator genotypes among non-smoking cases (n = 92) and controls (n = 125) was 38.0 and 24.0%, respectively [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–3.7]. No effect of NAT2 genotype was seen among smokers. Among non-smokers, the effect was marked for adenocarcinomas (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.0). As NAT2 activity is known to modify risk of arylamine-induced carcinogenesis, our results suggest that exposure to arylamines in the environment may play a role in risk of lung cancer among non-smokers.

Keywords: 4-ABP, 4-aminobiphenyl; NAT2, N-acetyltransferase-2.

Journal Article.  4317 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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