Journal Article

High frequency in esophageal cancers of p53 alterations inactivating the regulation of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis

Valérie Robert, Pierre Michel, Jean Michel Flaman, Anne Chiron, Cosette Martin, Francoise Charbonnier, Bernard Paillot and Thierry Frebourg

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 21, issue 4, pages 563-565
Published in print April 2000 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online April 2000 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/21.4.563
High frequency in esophageal cancers of p53 alterations inactivating the regulation of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Somatic mutations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been frequently detected in esophagal cancers, but their biological significance remains to be established. The tumor suppressor activity of p53 results in part from its ability to transactivate genes involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis, such as p21, bax and PIG3, and some p53 mutations may have a differential effect on the transactivation of these target genes. We developed yeast strains in which the activation by wild-type p53 of reporter plasmids containing p53 binding sites present within these target genes induces a change in the color of the colonies (red/white). Using these strains, we analyzed 56 esophageal cancers from patients residing in Normandy, France, a high incidence geographic area. Forty-seven tumors (84%), scored as mutant with the p21, bax and PIG3 reporter strains and in most of the cases (76%), the percentage of red colonies suggested that both p53 alleles were inactivated. Sequencing analysis allowed the identification of a p53 mutation in each positive sample, and the spectrum of mutations was in agreement with the etiological role of tobacco and alcohol. These results confirm the high frequency of biallelic p53 mutations in esophageal carcinoma and strongly suggest that their biological consequence is the complete alteration of the transactivation of genes involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis, which indicates that p53 alteration is a key event in esophagus carcinogenesis.

Journal Article.  2895 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.