Journal Article

Biomarkers of genotoxicity of air pollution (the AULIS project): bulky DNA adducts in subjects with moderate to low exposures to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their relationship to environmental tobacco smoke and other parameters

Panagiotis Georgiadis, Jan Topinka, Meni Stoikidou, Stella Kaila, Maria Gioka, Klea Katsouyanni, Radim Sram, Herman Autrup and Soterios A. Kyrtopoulos

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 22, issue 9, pages 1447-1457
Published in print September 2001 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online September 2001 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/22.9.1447
Biomarkers of genotoxicity of air pollution (the AULIS project): bulky DNA adducts in subjects with moderate to low exposures to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their relationship to environmental tobacco smoke and other parameters

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The levels of bulky DNA adducts were measured by 32P-post-labelling in lymphocytes of 194 non-smoking students living in the city of Athens and the region of Halkida, Greece, once in the winter and again in the following summer. Personal exposures to particulate-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were significantly higher in Athens subjects during both seasons. There was hardly any diagonal radioactive zone in the pattern of DNA adducts observed. Highest adduct levels were observed in a sub-group of subjects living in or near the Halkida Institute campus, which was located in rural surroundings with a minimal burden of urban air pollution. The remaining Halkida subjects had intermediate levels, while Athens subjects showed the lowest levels. This trend, which was observed over both monitoring seasons, consistently paralleled the variation in three markers of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), namely (i) declared times of exposure to ETS during the 24 h prior to blood donation, (ii) plasma cotinine levels and (iii) chrysene/benzo[g,h,i]perylene ratios in the profile of personal PAH exposure. Furthermore, among the Halkida campus area subjects (but not the remaining subjects) positive correlations were observed between DNA adducts and (i) measured personal exposures to chrysene or benzo[a]pyrene, (ii) time of declared ETS exposure and (iii) chrysene/benzo[g,h,i] perylene ratios. These correlations suggest that, for a group suffering minimal exposure to urban air pollution, exposure to ETS was a significant determinant of the observed DNA damage. Gender had a consistent and significant effect on adduct levels (males having higher levels), which remained significant even after multiple regression analysis. Habitual consumption of roasted meat was significantly associated with an enhancement of adduct levels and the effect was strengthened when only individuals unexposed to ETS were taken into consideration. No significant effects were observed for other dietary parameters or factors reflecting exposure to air pollution.

Keywords: B[a]A, benzo[a]anthracene; B[b]F, benzo[b]fluoranthene; B[k]F, benzo[k]fluoranthene; B[a]P, benzo[a]pyrene; BPer, benzo[g,h,i,]perylene; CHRYS, chrysene; ETS, environmental tobacco smoke; IND, indeno[1,2,3,d]pyrene; PAH, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; PM2.5, particulate matter <2.5 μm; TEI, Technical Educational Institute; TLAD, time—location—activity diary.

Journal Article.  9255 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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