Journal Article

4-Aminobiphenyl is a major etiological agent of human bladder cancer: evidence from its DNA binding spectrum in human <i>p53</i> gene

Zhaohui Feng, Wenwei Hu, William N. Rom, Frederick A. Beland and Moon-shong Tang

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 23, issue 10, pages 1721-1727
Published in print October 2002 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online October 2002 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/23.10.1721
4-Aminobiphenyl is a major etiological agent of human bladder cancer: evidence from its DNA binding spectrum in human p53 gene

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4-Aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) is a major etiological agent of human bladder cancer, and its metabolites are able to form DNA adducts that may induce mutation and initiate bladder carcinogenesis. Thirty to sixty percent of human bladder cancer has a mutation in the p53 gene, and the mutational spectrum bears two characteristics: compared with other cancers, the pattern of mutations is more evenly distributed along the p53 gene, and the mutational hotspots occur at both CpG sites, such as codons 175, 248 and 273, and non-CpG sites, such as codons 280 and 285, the latter two being unique mutational hotspots for bladder and other urinary tract cancers. These findings raise the possibility that the special p53 mutational features in human bladder cancer are due to the unique binding spectrum of metabolically activated 4-ABP in bladder cells. To address this question, here we have mapped the 4-ABP–DNA adduct distribution in the p53 gene at the nucleotide sequence level in human bladder cells. We found that, unlike benzo[a]pyrene trans-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide–DNA adduction, which preferentially occurs at CpG sites, 4-ABP–DNA adduction is not biased for CpG sites, and the adducts are more evenly distributed along the p53 gene; nonetheless, the p53 mutational hotspots in bladder cancer at codons 175, 248, 280 and 285 are also the preferential sites for 4-ABP adduct formation. These results strongly suggest that the unique binding spectrum of 4-ABP contributes greatly to the unique mutational spectrum in the p53 gene of human bladder cancer, and provide further molecular evidence to directly link 4-ABP to bladder cancer.

Keywords: 4-ABP, 4-aminobiphenyl; BPDE, benzo[a]pyrene trans-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide; dG-C8-4-ABP, N-(2′-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-ABP; N-OH-4-ABP, N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl; N-OH-N-Ac-4-ABP, N-hydroxy-N-acetyl-4-aminobiphenyl; LMPCR, ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction; PAH, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

Journal Article.  5096 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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