Journal Article

Effects of genetic background on prostate and taste bud carcinogenesis due to SV40 T antigen expression under probasin gene promoter control

Makoto Asamoto, Naomi Hokaiwado, Young-Man Cho and Tomoyuki Shirai

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 23, issue 3, pages 463-467
Published in print March 2002 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online March 2002 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/23.3.463
Effects of genetic background on prostate and taste bud carcinogenesis due to SV40 T antigen expression under probasin gene promoter control

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The incidence of prostate carcinomas in African–American men is greater than in white men, indicating genetic factors are involved in risk of this neoplasia. Recently, we have developed a transgenic rat model of prostate cancer, featuring development of malignancies within 15 weeks of age at very high incidence. Male transgenic rats with a Sprague–Dawley genetic background were mated with wild-type females of F344, Wistar and ACI strains. F1 male transgenic hybrids with female Wistar and ACI rats had significantly lowered incidences of prostate carcinomas. However, the serum level of testosterone, and expression of the transgene, probasin, and the androgen receptor did not correlate with the strain variation in tumor development. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of the SV40 Tag and the androgen receptor also did not reveal any differences between the strains. The transgenic rats additionally developed taste bud neuroblastomas at 100% incidence and this was suppressed in F1 male transgenic offspring with the ACI, but not the other strains. These results clearly show that genetic background influences prostate carcinogenesis and taste bud tumorigenesis in rats and that the present transgenic rats could provide a good model to identify specific factors.

Keywords: DMBA, 3,2′-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; PIN, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia; SD, Sprague–Dawley.

Journal Article.  3241 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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