Journal Article

Identification of one exon deletion of intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase in colon cancer HT-29 cells and a differentiation-related expression of the wild-type enzyme in Caco-2 cells

Jun Wu, Yajun Cheng, Åke Nilsson and Rui-Dong Duan

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 25, issue 8, pages 1327-1333
Published in print August 2004 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online August 2004 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgh140
Identification of one exon deletion of intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase in colon cancer HT-29 cells and a differentiation-related expression of the wild-type enzyme in Caco-2 cells

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism in the gut has been implicated in colonic tumorigenesis. Intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase (alk-SMase) hydrolyses SM in the intestinal content and at the brush border. The enzyme activity is decreased in the tissues of human colorectal tumours. This study examines whether site or chain-mutation of alk-SMase occurs in colon cancer HT-29 cells and Caco-2 cells. Total RNA was isolated and the cDNA of alk-SMase was amplified by RT–PCR. The size of the cDNA from HT-29 cells was smaller than that of the wild-type cDNA. DNA sequencing identified a deletion of exon 4 in alk-SMase cDNA in HT-29 cells. No mutation in genomic alk-SMase DNA from exon 3 to 5 was identified. The exon 4 deletion was caused by a shift of RNA splice site in chromosome 17q25. In Caco-2 cells, no mutation of alk-SMase cDNA was identified. Transient expression in COS-7 cells showed that the enzyme from the cDNA in HT-29 cells had little alk-SMase activity whereas that in Caco-2 cells was as active as the wild-type alk-SMase. The deleted region included residue His353, which is predicted to form a substrate-binding site of alk-SMase. H353A substitution resulted in a protein with no alk-SMase activity. In monolayer cultured Caco-2 cells and HT-29 cells the alk-SMase activities were low. However, to culture the cells under polarizing conditions increased alk-SMase activity and reduced SM level in Caco-2 cells. The alk-SMase activity varied in parallel with alkaline phosphatase activity. In conclusion, we identified an inactive deletion in alk-SMase in HT-29 cells, and a differentiation-related expression of the enzyme in Caco-2 cells. The results provide a molecular mechanism related to previous findings of reduced alk-SMase activity in human colon cancers.

Keywords: alk-SMase, sphingomyelinase; lyso-PC, lysophosphatidylcholine; PC, phosphatidylcholine; SM, sphingomyelin

Journal Article.  5163 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.