Journal Article

Carcinogenesis and apoptosis: paradigms and paradoxes

Boris Zhivotovsky and Sten Orrenius

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 27, issue 10, pages 1939-1945
ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online April 2006 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgl035
Carcinogenesis and apoptosis: paradigms and paradoxes

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Apoptosis is a physiological process of cell elimination, which is important for both maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and cell proliferation and differentiation. Disturbances in the cell death process might lead to uncontrolled cell growth and to tumor formation. In addition, proper function of the apoptotic machinery is critical for tumor susceptibility to treatment. Many pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes have been cloned and their significance for the proper function of the apoptotic pathways carefully investigated. However, the precise role of these genes and their products in cancer development is less clear. Here, we will discuss some of the current paradigms and paradoxes concerning the involvement of apoptotic genes in carcinogenesis.

Journal Article.  5689 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.