Journal Article

Green tea and black tea consumption in relation to colorectal cancer risk: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

Can-Lan Sun, Jian-Min Yuan, Woon Puay Koh, Hin-Peng Lee and Mimi C. Yu

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 28, issue 10, pages 2143-2148
Published in print October 2007 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online August 2007 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgm171
Green tea and black tea consumption in relation to colorectal cancer risk: the Singapore Chinese Health Study

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The relationships between green tea and black tea consumption and colorectal cancer risk were examined within the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort study of diet and cancer involving >60 000 men and women. Intake of green tea and black tea was assessed through in-person interviews. Incident cancer cases and deaths among cohort members were identified through record linkage of the cohort database with respective databases from the nationwide Singapore Cancer Registry and the Singapore Registry of Births and Deaths. The proportional hazard regression method was used to examine the associations between intake of green and black tea separately and colorectal cancer risk with adjustment for potential confounders. After an average of 8.9 years of follow-up, 845 colorectal cancer cases were identified. Subjects who drank green tea exhibited a statistically non-significant increase in risk [relative risk (RR) = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.97–1.29] relative to non-drinkers of green tea. This risk increase was mainly confined to men (RR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.08–1.58); the comparable RR in women was 0.89 (95% CI = 0.71–1.12). In men, the green tea–colorectal cancer association was noted mainly in those with advanced disease (Duke C or D) (RR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.19–1.97), and the association was dose dependent (P for trend = 0.0002). This latter association was especially strong within the colon subsite (RR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.24–2.46; P for trend < 0.0001). Irrespective of gender, intake of black tea was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer (RR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.79–1.07) in this Asian population.

Journal Article.  4741 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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