Journal Article

Tumor angiogenesis suppression by α-eleostearic acid, a linolenic acid isomer with a conjugated triene system, via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

Tsuyoshi Tsuzuki and Yuki Kawakami

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 29, issue 4, pages 797-806
Published in print April 2008 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online January 2008 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgm298
Tumor angiogenesis suppression by α-eleostearic acid, a linolenic acid isomer with a conjugated triene system, via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

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We have shown previously that α-eleostearic acid (ESA), a linolenic acid isomer with a conjugated triene system, suppresses tumor growth in vivo. In our earlier study, blood vessels were observed at the tumor surface in control mice, whereas in ESA-treated mice no such vessels were observed and the inner part of the tumor was discolored. These observations suggested that ESA might suppress cancer cell growth through malnutrition via a suppressive effect on tumor angiogenesis. In the current study, the antiangiogenic effects of ESA were investigated in vivo and in vitro. Tumor cell-induced vessel formation was clearly suppressed in mice orally administered ESA at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg/day in a dose-dependent manner. ESA also inhibited the formation of capillary-like networks by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and moderately inhibited HUVEC proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism by which ESA inhibited angiogenesis was through suppression of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2, activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and induction of apoptosis in HUVEC. We thus demonstrated that, like troglitazone, ESA is a PPARγ ligand and that it activates PPARγ, induces apoptosis in HUVEC and inhibits angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that ESA has potential use as a therapeutic dietary supplement and medicine for minimizing tumor angiogenesis.

Journal Article.  6616 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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