Journal Article

Genetic determinants in the metabolism of bladder carcinogens in relation to risk of bladder cancer

Jian-Min Yuan, Kenneth K. Chan, Gerhard A. Coetzee, J.Esteban Castelao, Mary A. Watson, Douglas A. Bell, Renwei Wang and Mimi C. Yu

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 29, issue 7, pages 1386-1393
Published in print July 2008 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online June 2008 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgn136
Genetic determinants in the metabolism of bladder carcinogens in relation to risk of bladder cancer

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Genetically determined factors that alter the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens can influence an individual’s susceptibility to bladder cancer. The associations between the genotypes of glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, GSTP1, GSTT1 and N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 1 and the phenotypes of NAT2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and bladder cancer risk were examined in a case–control study involving 731 bladder cancer patients and 740 control subjects in Los Angeles County, California. Individual null/low-activity genotypes of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 were associated with a 19–48% increase in odds ratio (OR) of bladder cancer. The strongest association was noted for GSTM1 [OR for the null genotype = 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19–1.83]. When the three GST genes were examined together, there was a monotonic, statistically significant association between increasing number of null/low-activity genotypes and risk (P for trend = 0.002). OR (95% CI) for one and two or more null/low-activity GST genotypes was 1.42 (1.12–1.81) and 1.71 (1.25–2.34), respectively, relative to the absence of null/low-activity GST genotype. NAT2 slow acetylation was associated with doubled risk of bladder cancer among individuals with known high exposures to carcinogenic arylamines (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.12–3.69, P = 0.02). The effect of NAT2 slow acetylation was even stronger in the presence of two or more null/low-activity GST genotypes. There were no associations between bladder cancer risk and NAT1 genotype or CYP1A2 phenotype.

Journal Article.  6597 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.