Journal Article

EGFR pathway polymorphisms and bladder cancer susceptibility and prognosis

Rebecca A. Mason, Elaine V. Morlock, Margaret R. Karagas, Karl T. Kelsey, Carmen J. Marsit, Alan R. Schned and Angeline S. Andrew

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 30, issue 7, pages 1155-1160
Published in print July 2009 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online April 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp077
EGFR pathway polymorphisms and bladder cancer susceptibility and prognosis

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The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has recently been appreciated as a central mediator of tumorigenesis and an important drug target; however, the influence of genetic variation in this pathway on bladder cancer is not understood. Pathway activation leads to cell proliferation, angiogenesis and is antiapoptotic. We sought to test the hypothesis that bladder cancer susceptibility and survival are modified by inherited variations in the sequence of the EGFR and its pathway members. We tested associations using a population-based study of 857 bladder cancer cases and 1191 controls from New Hampshire. Multifactor dimensionality reduction software was used to predict gene–gene interactions. We detected an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with variant genotypes for the single nucleotide polymorphisms EGFR_03 [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0–2.8)] and EGFR_05 [adjusted OR 1.5 (95% CI 1.0–2.1)] compared with wild-type. EGFR variants experienced longer survival than those with wild-type alleles [e.g. adjusted hazard ratio EGFR_1808 0.3 (95% CI 0.1–0.9)]. In contrast, the variant form of the ligand, EGF_04, had worse survival [adjusted hazard ratio 1.5 (95% CI 1.0–2.3)] compared with wild-type. Our findings suggest modified bladder cancer risk and survival associated with genetic variation in the EGFR pathway. Understanding these genetic influences on increased bladder cancer susceptibility and survival may help in cancer prevention, drug development and choice of therapeutic regimen.

Journal Article.  5125 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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