Journal Article

Genetic susceptibility to the development and progression of breast cancer associated with polymorphism of cell cycle and ubiquitin ligase genes

Jyh-Cherng Yu, Shian-ling Ding, Chih-Hao Chang, Shu-Hsin Kuo, Shou-Tung Chen, Giu-Cheng Hsu, Huan-Ming Hsu, Ming-Feng Hou, Lin Yi Jung, Chun-Wen Cheng, Pei-Ei Wu and Chen-Yang Shen

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 30, issue 9, pages 1562-1570
Published in print September 2009 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online July 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp173
Genetic susceptibility to the development and progression of breast cancer associated with polymorphism of cell cycle and ubiquitin ligase genes

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Tumor levels of the cell cycle regulators cyclin E and p27 correlate strongly with survival in breast cancer patients and are specifically regulated by the ubiquitin ligases hCDC4 and SKP2. This study was to explore whether genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is associated with polymorphism of these genes and whether gene–gene and gene–risk factor [i.e. full-term pregnancy (FTP)] interactions are important in determining cancer risk. A two-stage case–control study based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms was performed. The first study (560 cases and 1122 controls) was to define the contribution of cell cycle and ubiquitin ligase genes to cancer susceptibility. The second study (926 cases and 923 controls) was to confirm the association identified in the first stage and to map the variant alleles. Increased breast cancer risk was associated with both polymorphism of hCDC4 and a joint effect of cyclin E and hCDC4. These associations were more significant in nulliparous women, and cancer risk associated with a lower number of FTPs was only seen in women with a higher number of high-risk genotypes, providing support for an effect of gene–risk factor interaction in determining susceptibility. Sequence variants of intron 2 in hCDC4 were found to be the most significant polymorphism and high-stage estrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients carrying the homozygous variant genotype manifested significantly poorer survival. This study concludes that polymorphism of hCDC4 is a risk factor for breast cancer development by interacting with either cyclin E or FTP and may also prove useful in predicting progression of patients with high-stage and ER-negative breast cancers.

Journal Article.  6595 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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