Journal Article

Increasing fish consumption does not affect genotoxicity markers in the colon in an intervention study

Gerda K. Pot, Nina Habermann, Gosia Majsak-Newman, Linda J. Harvey, Anouk Geelen, Kasia Przybylska-Philips, Fokko M. Nagengast, Ben J.M. Witteman, Paul C. van de Meeberg, Andrew R. Hart, Gertjan Schaafsma, Guido Hooiveld, Michael Glei, Elizabeth K. Lund, Beatrice L. Pool-Zobel and Ellen Kampman

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 31, issue 6, pages 1087-1091
Published in print June 2010 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online October 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp255
Increasing fish consumption does not affect genotoxicity markers in the colon in an intervention study

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Observational studies suggest that fish consumption is associated with a decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A possible mechanism by which fish could reduce CRC risk is by decreasing colonic genotoxicity. However, concerns have also been raised over the levels of toxic compounds found in mainly oil-rich fish, which could increase genotoxicity. Therefore, the objective was to investigate the effects of fish on genotoxicity markers in the colon in a randomized controlled parallel intervention study. For a period of 6 months, subjects were randomly allocated to receive two extra weekly portions of (i) oil-rich fish (salmon), (ii) lean fish (cod) or (iii) just dietary advice (DA). The Comet Assay was used to measure the DNA damage-inducing potential of fecal water (n = 89) and DNA damage in colonocytes (n = 70) collected pre- and post-intervention as markers of genotoxicity. Genotoxicity of fecal water was not markedly changed after fish consumption: 1.0% increase in tail intensity (TI) [95% confidence interval (CI) −5.1; 7.0] in the salmon group and 0.4% increase in TI (95% CI −5.3; 6.1) in the cod group compared with the DA group. DNA damage in colonocytes was also not significantly changed after fish consumption, in either the salmon group (−0.5% TI, 95% CI −6.9; 6.0) or cod group (−3.3% TI, 95% CI −10.8; 4.3) compared with the DA group. Measurements of genotoxicity of fecal water and DNA damage in colonocytes did not correlate (r = 0.06, n = 34). In conclusion, increasing consumption of either oil-rich or lean fish did not affect genotoxicity markers in the colon.

Journal Article.  4965 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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