Journal Article

Differential effects of reactive nitrogen species on DNA base excision repair initiated by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase

Larry E. Jones, Lei Ying, Anne B. Hofseth, Elena Jelezcova, Robert W. Sobol, Stefan Ambs, Curtis C. Harris, Michael Graham Espey, Lorne J. Hofseth and Michael D. Wyatt

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 30, issue 12, pages 2123-2129
Published in print December 2009 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online October 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp256
Differential effects of reactive nitrogen species on DNA base excision repair initiated by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase

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Chronic generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can cause DNA damage and may also directly modify DNA repair proteins. RNS-modified DNA is repaired predominantly by the base excision repair (BER) pathway, which includes the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG). The AAG active site contains several tyrosines and cysteines that are potential sites for modification by RNS. In vitro, we demonstrate that RNS differentially alter AAG activity depending on the site and type of modification. Nitration of tyrosine 162 impaired 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA)-excision activity, whereas nitrosation of cysteine 167 increased εA excision. To understand the effects of RNS on BER in vivo, we examined intestinal adenomas for levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and AAG. A striking correlation between AAG and iNOS expression was observed (r = 0.76, P = 0.00002). Interestingly, there was no correlation between changes in AAG levels and enzymatic activity. We found AAG to be nitrated in human adenomas, suggesting that this RNS modification is relevant in the human disease. Expression of key downstream components of BER, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) and DNA polymerase β (POLβ), was also examined. POLβ protein was increased in nearly all adenomas compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, whereas APE1 expression was only increased in approximately half of the adenomas and also was relocalized to the cytoplasm in adenomas. Collectively, the results suggest that BER is dysregulated in colon adenomas. RNS-induced posttranslational modification of AAG is one mechanism of BER dysregulation, and the type of modification may define the role of AAG during carcinogenesis.

Journal Article.  6137 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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