Journal Article

Inflammation and cancer: interweaving microRNA, free radical, cytokine and p53 pathways

Aaron J. Schetter, Niels H. H. Heegaard and Curtis C. Harris

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 31, issue 1, pages 37-49
Published in print January 2010 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online December 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgp272
Inflammation and cancer: interweaving microRNA, free radical, cytokine and p53 pathways

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Chronic inflammation and infection are major causes of cancer. There are continued improvements to our understanding of the molecular connections between inflammation and cancer. Key mediators of inflammation-induced cancer include nuclear factor kappa B, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, inflammatory cytokines, prostaglandins and specific microRNAs. The collective activity of these mediators is largely responsible for either a pro-tumorigenic or anti-tumorigenic inflammatory response through changes in cell proliferation, cell death, cellular senescence, DNA mutation rates, DNA methylation and angiogenesis. As our understanding grows, inflammatory mediators will provide opportunities to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. In this review, we provide a general overview of the connection between inflammation, microRNAs and cancer and highlight how our improved understanding of these connections may provide novel preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the health burden of cancer.

Journal Article.  10472 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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