Journal Article

Occupational exposure to trichloroethylene is associated with a decline in lymphocyte subsets and soluble CD27 and CD30 markers

Qing Lan, Luoping Zhang, Xiaojiang Tang, Min Shen, Martyn T. Smith, Chuangyi Qiu, Yichen Ge, Zhiying Ji, Jun Xiong, Jian He, Boris Reiss, Zhenyue Hao, Songwang Liu, Yuxuan Xie, Weihong Guo, Mark P. Purdue, Noe Galvan, Kerry X. Xin, Wei Hu, Laura E. Beane Freeman, Aaron E. Blair, Laiyu Li, Nathaniel Rothman, Roel Vermeulen and Hanlin Huang

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 31, issue 9, pages 1592-1596
Published in print September 2010 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online June 2010 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgq121
Occupational exposure to trichloroethylene is associated with a decline in lymphocyte subsets and soluble CD27 and CD30 markers

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Occupational cohort and case–control studies suggest that trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure may be associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) but findings are not consistent. There is a need for mechanistic studies to evaluate the biologic plausibility of this association. We carried out a cross-sectional molecular epidemiology study of 80 healthy workers that used TCE and 96 comparable unexposed controls in Guangdong, China. Personal exposure measurements were taken over a three-week period before blood collection. Ninety-six percent of workers were exposed to TCE below the current US Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit (100 p.p.m. 8 h time-weighted average), with a mean (SD) of 22.2 (36.0) p.p.m. The total lymphocyte count and each of the major lymphocyte subsets including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and B cells were significantly decreased among the TCE-exposed workers compared with controls (P < 0.05), with evidence of a dose-dependent decline. Further, there was a striking 61% decline in sCD27 plasma level and a 34% decline in sCD30 plasma level among TCE-exposed workers compared with controls. This is the first report that TCE exposure under the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration workplace standard is associated with a decline in all major lymphocyte subsets and sCD27 and sCD30, which play an important role in regulating cellular activity in subsets of T, B and NK cells and are associated with lymphocyte activation. Given that altered immunity is an established risk factor for NHL, these results add to the biologic plausibility that TCE is a possible lymphomagen.

Journal Article.  3111 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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