Journal Article

PTEN and p53 cross-regulation induced by soy isoflavone genistein promotes mammary epithelial cell cycle arrest and lobuloalveolar differentiation

Omar M. Rahal and Rosalia C.M. Simmen

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 31, issue 8, pages 1491-1500
Published in print August 2010 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online June 2010 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgq123
PTEN and p53 cross-regulation induced by soy isoflavone genistein promotes mammary epithelial cell cycle arrest and lobuloalveolar differentiation

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The tumor suppressors phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and p53 are closely related to the pathogenesis of breast cancer, yet pathway-specific mechanisms underlying their participation in mediating the protective actions of dietary bioactive components on breast cancer risk are poorly understood. We recently showed that dietary exposure to the soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) induced PTEN expression in mammary epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro, consistent with the breast cancer preventive effects of soy food consumption. Here, we evaluated PTEN and p53 functional interactions in the nuclear compartment of mammary epithelial cells as a mechanism for mammary tumor protection by GEN. Using the non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells MCF10-A, we demonstrate that GEN increased PTEN expression and nuclear localization. We show that increased nuclear PTEN levels initiated an autoregulatory loop involving PTEN-dependent increases in p53 nuclear localization, PTEN–p53 physical association, PTEN–p53 co-recruitment to the PTEN promoter region and p53 transactivation of PTEN promoter activity. The PTEN–p53 cross talk induced by GEN resulted in increased cell cycle arrest; decreased pro-proliferative cyclin D1 and pleiotrophin gene expression and the early formation of mammary acini, indicative of GEN promotion of lobuloalveolar differentiation. Our findings provide support to GEN-induced PTEN as both a target and regulator of p53 action and offer a mechanistic basis for PTEN pathway activation to underlie the antitumor properties of dietary factors, with important implications for reducing breast cancer risk.

Journal Article.  6055 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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