Journal Article

Genetic variations in regulator of G-protein signaling genes as susceptibility loci for second primary tumor/recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

Jianming Wang, Scott M. Lippman, J.Jack Lee, Hushan Yang, Fadlo R. Khuri, Edward Kim, Jie Lin, David W. Chang, Reuben Lotan, Waun K. Hong and Xifeng Wu

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 31, issue 10, pages 1755-1761
Published in print October 2010 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online July 2010 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgq138
Genetic variations in regulator of G-protein signaling genes as susceptibility loci for second primary tumor/recurrence in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

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Curatively treated patients with early-stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are at high risks for second primary tumor (SPT) and recurrence. The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) is important in essential signaling transduction and cellular activities. We hypothesize that genetic variations of RGS may modulate the risk of SPT/recurrence in patients with early-stage HNSCC. In a nested case–control study, we evaluated 98 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 17 RGS genes for the risk of SPT/recurrence among 450 HNSCC patients. Eight SNPs showed significant associations with the risk of SPT/recurrence, with the most significant one of rs2179653, which is located in the 5′-flanking region of RGS2 gene. Under a recessive genetic model, the homozygous variant genotype of this SNP was associated with 2.95-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.52–5.74] increased risk of SPT/recurrence. This association remained significant after the adjustment for multiple comparisons. Cumulative effects analysis revealed that the risk increased significantly with the increasing numbers of unfavorable genotypes. Compared with subjects carrying 0–2 unfavorable genotypes, the hazard ratios (95% CIs) for those carrying 3 or 4+ were 1.73 (1.10–2.70) and 3.05 (1.92–4.83), respectively. Furthermore, survival tree analysis revealed potential higher order gene–gene interactions and indicated different outcomes based on distinct genotype profiles. Genetic variations of RGS genes may modulate the susceptibility to SPT/recurrence in early-stage HNSCC patients individually and cumulatively. Our results stressed the importance of taking a polygenic approach to evaluate the cumulative and interaction effects of genetic variations in the prediction of cancer risk and prognosis.

Journal Article.  4579 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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