Journal Article

Impact of RECK gene polymorphisms and environmental factors on oral cancer susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan

Tsung-Te Chung, Min-Shing Pan, Chien-Long Kuo, Ruey-Hong Wong, Chiao-Wen Lin, Mu-Kuan Chen and Shun-Fa Yang

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 32, issue 7, pages 1063-1068
Published in print July 2011 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online May 2011 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgr083
Impact of RECK gene polymorphisms and environmental factors on oral cancer susceptibility and clinicopathologic characteristics in Taiwan

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Oral cancer is the fourth common male cancer and causally associated with environmental carcinogens in Taiwan. The reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) has a significant effect on tumorigenesis by limiting angiogenesis and invasion of tumors through the extracellular matrix. RECK downregulation has been confirmed in many human cancers and associated with lymph node metastasis clinically. In the present hospital-based case-controlled study, the demographic, RECK genotype and clinicopathologic data from 341 male oral cancer patients and 415 cancer-free controls were investigated. We found that RECK rs10814325, rs16932912, rs11788747 or rs10972727 polymorphisms were not associated with oral cancer susceptibility. Among 488 smokers, RECK polymorphisms carriers with betel quid chewing have a 7.62-fold [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.96–19.64] to 25.33-fold (95% CI, 9.57–67.02) risk to have oral cancer compared with RECK wild-type carrier without betel quid chewing. Among 352 betel quid chewers, RECK polymorphisms carriers with smoking have a 6.68-fold (95% CI, 1.21–36.93) to 18.57-fold (95% CI, 3.80–90.80) risk to have oral cancer compared with those who carried wild-type without smoking. In 263 betel quid chewing oral cancer patients, RECK rs10814325 polymorphism have a 2.26-fold (95% CI, 1.19–4.29) risk to have neck lymph node metastasis compared with RECK wild-type carrier. These results support that gene–environment interactions between the RECK polymorphisms, smoking and betel quid may alter oral cancer susceptibility and metastasis.

Journal Article.  4227 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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