Journal Article

Effects of <i>S</i>-adenosylmethionine and methylthioadenosine on inflammation-induced colon cancer in mice

Tony W.H. Li, Heping Yang, Hui Peng, Meng Xia, José M. Mato and Shelly C. Lu

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 33, issue 2, pages 427-435
Published in print February 2012 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online December 2011 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgr295
Effects of S-adenosylmethionine and methylthioadenosine on inflammation-induced colon cancer in mice

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Chronic inflammation is an underlying risk factor for colon cancer. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays a critical role in the development of inflammation-induced colon cancer in a mouse model. S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) and its metabolite methylthioadenosine (MTA) can inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α expression in macrophages. The aim of this work was to examine whether SAMe and MTA are effective in preventing inflammation-induced colon cancer and if so identify signaling pathways affected. Balb/c mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium to induce colon cancer. Two days after AOM treatment, mice were divided into three groups: vehicle control, SAMe or MTA. Tumor load, histology, immunohistochemistry, gene and protein expression were determined. SAMe and MTA treatment reduced tumor load by ∼40%. Both treatments raised SAMe and MTA levels but MTA also raised S-adenosylhomocysteine levels. MTA treatment prevented the induction of many genes known to play pathogenetic roles in this model except for TNF-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). SAMe also had no effect on TNF-α or iNOS and was less inhibitory than MTA on the other genes. In vivo, both treatments induced apoptosis but inhibited proliferation, β-catenin, nuclear factor kappa B activation and interleukin (IL) 6 signaling. Effect of SAMe and MTA on IL-6 signaling was examined using Colo 205 colon cancer cells. In these cells, SAMe and MTA inhibited IL-6-induced IL-10 expression. MTA also inhibited IL-10 transcription and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. In conclusion, SAMe and MTA reduced inflammation-induced colon cancer and inhibited several pathways important in colon carcinogenesis.

Journal Article.  5614 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.