Journal Article

Polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzymes, fish intake, and risk of prostate cancer

Chelsea Catsburg, Amit D. Joshi, Román Corral, Juan Pablo Lewinger, Jocelyn Koo, Esther M. John, Sue A. Ingles and Mariana C. Stern

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 33, issue 7, pages 1352-1359
Published in print July 2012 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online May 2012 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgs175
Polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism enzymes, fish intake, and risk of prostate cancer

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Cooking fish at high temperature can produce potent carcinogens such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The effects of these carcinogens may undergo modification by the enzymes responsible for their detoxification and/or activation. In this study, we investigated genetic polymorphisms in nine carcinogen metabolism enzymes and their modifying effects on the association between white or dark fish consumption and prostate cancer (PCA) risk. We genotyped 497 localized and 936 advanced PCA cases and 760 controls from the California Collaborative Case–Control Study of Prostate Cancer. Three polymorphisms, EPHX1 Tyr113His, CYP1B1 Leu432Val and GSTT1 null/present, were associated with localized PCA risk. The PTGS2 765 G/C polymorphism modified the association between white fish consumption and advanced PCA risk (interaction P 5 0.002), with high white fish consumption being positively associated with risk only among carriers of the C allele. This effect modification by PTGS2 genotype was stronger when restricted to consumption of well-done white fish (interaction P 5 0.021). These findings support the hypotheses that changes in white fish brought upon by high-temperature cooking methods, such as carcinogen accumulation and/or fatty acid composition changes, may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. However, the gene–diet interactions should be interpreted with caution given the limited sample size. Thus, our findings require further validation with additional studies.

Abbreviations:

AA

African American;

BMI

body mass index;

CI

confidence interval;

CNV

copy number variant;

EPIC

European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition;

HCA

heterocyclic amine;

HCFA

Health Care Financing Administration;

LAC

Los Angeles county;

MAF

minor allele frequency;

NHW

non-Hispanic White;

OR

odds ratio;

PAH

polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon;

PCA

prostate cancer;

PTGS2

prostaglandin- endoperoxide synthase 2;

PUFA

polyunsaturated fatty acids;

RDD

random-digit dialing;

SEER

Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result;

SES

socio-economic status;

SFBA

San Francisco Bay Area;

SNP

single-nucleotide polymorphism

Journal Article.  7360 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.