Journal Article

DNA repair gene variants in relation to overall cancer risk: a population-based study

Anthony J. Alberg, Timothy J. Jorgensen, Ingo Ruczinski, Lee Wheless, Yin Yao Shugart, Yvette Berthier-Schaad, Bailey Kessing, Judith Hoffman-Bolton, Kathy J. Helzlsouer, W.H.Linda Kao, Lesley Francis, Rhoda M. Alani, Michael W. Smith and Paul T. Strickland

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 34, issue 1, pages 86-92
Published in print January 2013 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online October 2012 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgs304
DNA repair gene variants in relation to overall cancer risk: a population-based study

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The hypothesis that germ-line polymorphisms in DNA repair genes influence cancer risk has previously been tested primarily on a cancer site-specific basis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNA repair gene allelic variants contribute to globally elevated cancer risk by measuring associations with risk of all cancers that occurred within a population-based cohort. In the CLUE II cohort study established in 1989 in Washington County, MD, this study was comprised of all 3619 cancer cases ascertained through 2007 compared with a sample of 2296 with no cancer. Associations were measured between 759 DNA repair gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of all cancers. A SNP in O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMT, (rs2296675) was significantly associated with overall cancer risk [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19–1.43 and P-value: 4.1 × 10−8]. The association between rs2296675 and cancer risk was stronger among those aged ≤54 years old than those who were ≥55 years at baseline (P-for-interaction = 0.021). OR were in the direction of increased risk for all 15 categories of malignancies studied (P < 0.0001), ranging from 1.22 (P = 0.42) for ovarian cancer to 2.01 (P = 0.008) for urinary tract cancers; the smallest P-value was for breast cancer (OR 1.45, P = 0.0002). The results indicate that the minor allele of MGMT SNP rs2296675, a common genetic marker with 37% carriers, was significantly associated with increased risk of cancer across multiple tissues. Replication is needed to more definitively determine the scientific and public health significance of this observed association.

Journal Article.  6464 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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