Journal Article

Phytanic acid and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Nicholas J. Ollberding, Briseis Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Donne Bennett D. Caces, Margaret E. Wright, Dennis D. Weisenburger, Sonali M. Smith and Brian C.-H. Chiu

in Carcinogenesis

Volume 34, issue 1, pages 170-175
Published in print January 2013 | ISSN: 0143-3334
Published online October 2012 | e-ISSN: 1460-2180 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgs315
Phytanic acid and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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Greater consumption of red meat, processed meat and dairy products has been associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in several previous reports. Phytanic acid, a saturated fatty acid obtained primarily through the consumption of ruminant meat and dairy products, may offer a potential underlying mechanism for these associations. In a population-based case–control study of 336 cases and 460 controls conducted in Nebraska during 1999–2002, we examined whether phytanic acid-containing foods or total phytanic acid intake, estimated from a food frequency questionnaire and the published phytanic acid values of 151 food items, were associated with increased NHL risk. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals for overall NHL and the common NHL histologic subtypes. In multivariable models, higher intakes of density-adjusted beef [ORT3 vs. T1 = 1.5 (1.1–2.2); Ptrend = 0.02], total dairy products [OR = 1.5 (1.1–2.2); Ptrend = 0.02) and milk [OR = 1.6 (1.1–2.3); Ptrend = 0.01] were associated with an increased risk of NHL. Intake of total phytanic acid was positively associated with NHL risk [OR = 1.5 (1.0–2.1); Ptrend = 0.04]. In analyses stratified by NHL subtype, greater consumption of beef was associated with an increased risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and greater consumption of milk was associated with an increased risk of follicular lymphoma (FL). Total phytanic acid intake was associated with an increased risk of FL and small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Our results provide support that total phytanic acid and phytanic acid-containing foods may increase NHL risk.

Journal Article.  5337 words. 

Subjects: Clinical Cytogenetics and Molecular Genetics

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