Journal Article

Glossopharyngeal Nerve Transection Does Not Alter Taste Reactivity to Sucrose Conditioned to be Aversive

Shachar Eylam, Mircea Garcea and Alan C. Spector

in Chemical Senses

Volume 25, issue 4, pages 423-428
Published in print August 2000 | ISSN: 0379-864X
Published online August 2000 | e-ISSN: 1464-3553 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/chemse/25.4.423
Glossopharyngeal Nerve Transection Does Not Alter Taste Reactivity to Sucrose Conditioned to be Aversive

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Glossopharyngeal nerve (GL) transection in rats is known to markedly reduce gaping, a stereotypical aversive oromotor behavior, in response to intraorally delivered quinine. In this experiment we tested whether GL transection would reduce gaping in response to an otherwise palatable stimulus (sucrose) but conditioned to be aversive. Sprague–Dawley rats were implanted with intraoral cannulae. Five received bilateral transection of the GL and five served as sham-operated controls. Water-deprived rats were presented with 0.3 M sucrose for 15 min immediately followed by an injection of 0.15 M LiCl on three occasions. Rats were then habituated to the taste reactivity chamber and intraoral fluid infusion for 3 days, and tested on day 4 with a 1 ml infusion (1 min) of 0.3 M sucrose. All rats drank negligible amounts of sucrose by the third conditioning session and there were no differences in sucrose intake between the groups. There were no significant differences in gapes, or any other measured oromotor response, to sucrose between GL-transected and sham-operated rats. These results show that the GL is not a necessary afferent limb for gaping in response to conditionally aversive taste compounds.

Journal Article.  3717 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Molecular and Cell Biology

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