Journal Article

Epidemiology of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Deaths in the United States, April–July 2009

Ashley L. Fowlkes, Paul Arguin, Matthew S. Biggerstaff, Jacqueline Gindler, Dianna Blau, Seema Jain, Roseline Dhara, Joe McLaughlin, Elizabeth Turnipseed, John J. Meyer, Janice K. Louie, Alan Siniscalchi, Janet J. Hamilton, Ariane Reeves, Sarah Y. Park, Deborah Richter, Matthew D. Ritchey, Noelle M. Cocoros, David Blythe, Susan Peters, Ruth Lynfield, Lesha Peterson, Jannifer Anderson, Zack Moore, Robin Williams, Lisa McHugh, Carmen Cruz, Christine L. Waters, Shannon L. Page, Christie K. McDonald, Meredith Vandermeer, Kirsten Waller, Utpala Bandy, Timothy F. Jones, Lesley Bullion, Valoree Vernon, Kathryn H. Lofy, Thomas Haupt and Lyn Finelli

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 52, issue suppl_1, pages S60-S68
Published in print January 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciq022
Epidemiology of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Deaths in the United States, April–July 2009

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During the spring of 2009, pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) was recognized and rapidly spread worldwide. To describe the geographic distribution and patient characteristics of pH1N1-associated deaths in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requested information from health departments on all laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 deaths reported from 17 April through 23 July 2009. Data were collected using medical charts, medical examiner reports, and death certificates. A total of 377 pH1N1-associated deaths were identified, for a mortality rate of .12 deaths per 100 000 population. Activity was geographically localized, with the highest mortality rates in Hawaii, New York, and Utah. Seventy-six percent of deaths occurred in persons aged 18–65 years, and 9% occurred in persons aged ≥65 years. Underlying medical conditions were reported for 78% of deaths: chronic lung disease among adults (39%) and neurologic disease among children (54%). Overall mortality associated with pH1N1 was low; however, the majority of deaths occurred in persons aged <65 years with underlying medical conditions.

Journal Article.  4321 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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