Journal Article

Influenza-Like Illness in a Community Surrounding a School-Based Outbreak of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus–Chicago, Illinois, 2009

Kristen B. Janusz, Jennifer E. Cortes, Fadila Serdarevic, Roderick C. Jones, Joshua D. Jones, Kathleen A. Ritger, Julie Y. Morita, Susan I. Gerber, L. Gallagher, Brad J. Biggerstaff, Lauri A. Hicks, David L. Swerdlow, Marc Fischer and J. Erin Staples

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 52, issue suppl_1, pages S94-S101
Published in print January 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciq025
Influenza-Like Illness in a Community Surrounding a School-Based Outbreak of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus–Chicago, Illinois, 2009

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In April 2009, following the first school closure due to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) (pH1N1) in Chicago, Illinois, area hospitals were inundated with patients presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI). The extent of disease spread into the surrounding community was unclear. We performed a household survey to estimate the ILI attack rate among community residents and compared reported ILI with confirmed pH1N1 cases and ILI surveillance data (ie, hospital ILI visits, influenza testing, and school absenteeism). The estimated ILI attack rate was 4.6% (95% confidence interval, 2.8%-7.4%), with cases distributed throughout the 5-week study period. In contrast, 36 (84%) of 43 confirmed pH1N1 cases were identified the week of the school closure. Trends in surveillance data peaked during the same week and rapidly decreased to near baseline. Public awareness and health care practices impact standard ILI surveillance data. Community-based surveys are a valuable tool to help assess the burden of ILI in a community.

Journal Article.  4334 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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